Saturday, June 27, 2015

Currently Reading | June

This month...all novels. No shame.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Hmm...what to say about Americanah? Honestly the plot was just eh, okay. The story alone could not carry this book. And I was not impressed by the characters. You get the feeling Ifemelu is supposed to be a strong, resilient character...I just got indecisive and a lot of whine. And the same goes for Obinze. I couldn't attach to any of the characters which is a bad sign for any book. BUT! The redeeming aspect of this book was the chance to see America and specifically race in America through the eyes of an African woman living in America. (American three times in one sentence...I deserve a patriotic award.) Eye opening, it will challenge your thinking. Even though the story was lame, I gotta say, it was engaging. Due to some content and darker themes I would only recommend to mature readers.

Bruno Chief of Police by Martin Walker
This book was really just cozy, fun fluff. Recommended by my librarian, this murder mystery centers on Bruno, Chief of Police in a small town in the south of France. The setting was just so fun and every time food is mentioned (which is often) it made me hungry...Bruno has some cooking talent and hopefully he will publish a cookbook some day! But the best part of this book was the snippets of WWII history throughout the story.

And speaking of WWII...never mind we'll come back to that...best for last, you know. First let's touch on...

A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler
Love, love, love! A Spool of Blue Thread tells the story of four generations of the Whitshank family. Their struggles, their hopes, their failures. The story centers in their family home in Baltimore. (I love books that take place in Maryland.) It's a book about family...a cross between The Happy Yellow Car and A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. The story is beautiful. The writing is beautiful. The characters, in all their flawed glory, are beautiful. It makes you want to cry and laugh at the same time and really encourages you to treasure family. Can't recommend enough, I will definitely be looking up more by this author! And just to give you a sample of Anne Tyler's writing...

“For years, she had been in mourning for the way she had let her life slip through her fingers. Given another chance, she’d told herself, she would take more care to experience it. But lately, she was finding that she had experienced it after all and just forgotten, and now it was returning to her.” 

“You wake in the morning, you’re feeling fine, but all at once you think, 'Something’s not right. Something’s off somewhere; what is it?' And then you remember that it’s your child—whichever one is unhappy.”

"There was nothing remarkable about the Whitshanks. None of them was famous. None of them could claim exceptional intelligence. And in looks, they were no more than average... But like most families, they imagined they were special. They took great pride... At times they made a little too much of the family quirks—of both Amanda and Jeannie marrying men named Hugh, for instance, so that their husbands were referred to as “Amanda’s Hugh” and “Jeannie’s Hugh”; or their genetic predisposition for lying awake two hours in the middle of every night; or their uncanny ability to keep their dogs alive for eons. ”

Just go read the book before I end up posting the entire manuscript.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
Oh goodness. This book. I've always had a thing for WWII books (not really sure why but there you have it). And this story is particularly touching. It follows three parallel stories: 1. A young, blind French girl, Marie-Laure, as she flees Paris with her father to live with her uncle who still suffers from the ghosts of the Great War 2. Werner, a German boy whose talent with radios and the sciences lands him in Hitler's Youth and 3. The Sea of Flames, a priceless diamond fabled to protect the owner and destroy everyone the owner holds dear. And yes, I know that sounds weird but as the stories of these three come together it makes sense. It's a dark, emotional story but so worth it for the chance to witness a little light in such a dark part of history. Again, I would only recommend for mature readers because of some very dark themes. And I will warn you, it is almost impossible to put down...I read over five-hundred pages in six days...which is pretty much unheard of for me but gives you an idea just how engrossing it is!

I will be back next month and I promise there is nonfiction in the lineup!

Always on the lookout for recommendations...what are you reading?

Until then...

8 comments:

  1. I'm drawn to the quotes you shared from A Spool of Blue Thread -- it sounds like a beautiful story. I love books riddled with familial quirks and memoir elements, especially in the summertime (The Saturdays, anyone?). ^_^

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    1. Yes! Exactly the sort of book you would enjoy...let me know what you think! Would you believe I haven't read The Saturdays? I guess it's time to do something about that...

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  2. Mm I'm going to have to read "All The Light We Cannot See"! It sounds like exactly the sort of mysterious historic literature to tuck into on a rainy day. <3

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    1. You will not regret it...just keep some Kleenex near by. :) And let me know if you like it!

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  3. Oh I love WWII books as well! Or any books that take place in significant historical times. I'm currently reading the Zookeeper's wife. Definitely recommend it! (PS. I moved my blog to goldenpolkadots.blogspot.com, decided to change the name last minute).

    <3 Roxi

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    1. Thanks for the new URL...I was wondering what happened to your blog...so glad to know it's still alive! :) I just heard about The Zookeepers Wife...sounds exactly like the sort of book I would enjoy and it's on my reading list!

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  4. I need to read All The Light... it's been on my reader since December but I haven't quite gotten to it.

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    1. Read it...so worth all the emotions :)

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